Picnooga

Young woman with a laynard on the roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. Charles Walline

Title: Young woman with a laynard on the roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0014

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

A young woman stands on the roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. She is resting against a tall structure with her elbows bent and propped on top of it. She is wearing a dress with a dark pattern that has flounces at the sleeves and along the v-neck. She is wearing a mannish hat, and has a long white lanyard around her neck that hooks into the belt of her dress. There is a white handkerchief in her right hand. The hat appears to be the same one the woman in image 2015.001.0012 is wearing.

This woman is one of three featured in image 2015.001.018. Along with the woman in 2015.001.12.

In the background you can see the Chattanooga Times (Dome) Building and the spires of The Old Stone Church (original site of the First-Centenary United Methodist Church) on Georgia Avenue and the Mountain City Business College on E. 8th Street.

In 1875, David Bernard Loveman and his brother Herman Herschel Loveman arrived in Chattanooga from Atlanta, Georgia and formed D. B. Loveman and Bro., a dry goods concern. In 1877, Ismar Noa joined the company and it became D. B. Loveman & Company. In 1884 they purchased a property at the southeast corner of Eighth and Market Streets, in what was described as “the most important single real estate transaction that had taken place” in Chattanooga up until that time. Building commenced in 1885, and the city’s first department store was constructed. It would become Chattanooga’s largest department store, and remain so for just over a hundred years.

December 26, 1891, the building was destroyed by fire and the business suffered accordingly. David even declared bankruptcy, but business did not cease. Eventually, the company regained its footing and prospered, employing 300 people by 1917. In addition to the downtown Chattanooga flagship store, Loveman’s expanded to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with several suburban stores in Chattanooga with locations such as East Ridge, Tennessee. Loveman’s established a store at Eastgate Mall in 1965. In the early 1970s, Loveman’s located in the former JCPenney store in Highland Plaza. (In 1972, JCPenney opened at the then-new Northgate Mall in nearby Hixson.) In 1980, Loveman’s was an original anchor at Walnut Square Mall in Dalton, Georgia. Loveman’s final expansion came as an anchor at Hamilton Place Mall in 1987.

In 1988, however, the chain, which had acquired considerable debt, was bought by Proffitt’s, which in turn was acquired in 2005 by Belk. Starting in 2001, the flagship downtown building had been converted to mixed use, with luxury condominiums on the upper floors developed by RiverCity Company. In August 2008, the 31,000-square-foot (2,900 m2) second floor was purchased at auction by the Maclellan Foundation for $1.4 million. Cohutta Banking Co. of Tennessee plans to move during the fall of 2008, into 15,000 square feet (1,400 m2) on the building’s ground floor.

Source: Wikipedia

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

Young woman on roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. Charles Walline

Title: Young woman on roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0012

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

A young woman stands on the third-story of the roof of D. B. Loveman & Co. building. There is a tall structure behind her and she is resting her left arm along it while her right hand is on her hip. She is wearing a dark skirt with a fitted jacket that has mutton sleeves and frog fasteners. It is open at the breast and shows a white shirt underneath. She is wearing a hat that has white mesh circling the top. It appears to be the same hat that the woman in image 2015.001.0014 is wearing.

This woman is also featured in image 2015.001.018. Along with the woman featured in image 2015.001.014.

In the background, you can see the Chattanooga Times (Dome) Building and the spires of The Old Stone Church (original site of the First-Centenary United Methodist Church) on Georgia Avenue and the Mountain City Business College on E. 8th Street.

In 1875, David Bernard Loveman and his brother Herman Herschel Loveman arrived in Chattanooga from Atlanta, Georgia and formed D. B. Loveman and Bro., a dry goods concern. In 1877, Ismar Noa joined the company and it became D. B. Loveman & Company. In 1884 they purchased a property at the southeast corner of Eighth and Market Streets, in what was described as “the most important single real estate transaction that had taken place” in Chattanooga up until that time. Building commenced in 1885, and the city’s first department store was constructed. It would become Chattanooga’s largest department store, and remain so for just over a hundred years.

December 26, 1891, the building was destroyed by fire and the business suffered accordingly. David even declared bankruptcy, but business did not cease. Eventually, the company regained its footing and prospered, employing 300 people by 1917. In addition to the downtown Chattanooga flagship store, Loveman’s expanded to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with several suburban stores in Chattanooga with locations such as East Ridge, Tennessee. Loveman’s established a store at Eastgate Mall in 1965. In the early 1970s, Loveman’s located in the former JCPenney store in Highland Plaza. (In 1972, JCPenney opened at the then-new Northgate Mall in nearby Hixson.) In 1980, Loveman’s was an original anchor at Walnut Square Mall in Dalton, Georgia. Loveman’s final expansion came as an anchor at Hamilton Place Mall in 1987.

In 1988, however, the chain, which had acquired considerable debt, was bought by Proffitt’s, which in turn was acquired in 2005 by Belk. Starting in 2001, the flagship downtown building had been converted to mixed use, with luxury condominiums on the upper floors developed by RiverCity Company. In August 2008, the 31,000-square-foot (2,900 m2) second floor was purchased at auction by the Maclellan Foundation for $1.4 million. Cohutta Banking Co. of Tennessee plans to move during the fall of 2008, into 15,000 square feet (1,400 m2) on the building’s ground floor.

Source: Wikipedia

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

An older man with a dog, White Oak Cemetery. Charles Walline

Title: An older man with a dog, White Oak Cemetery. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0012

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

An older man and a Spaniel-type dog are in an open space within White Oak Cemetery. The man is wearing a dark, three-piece suit and dark hat. He has a long goatee and moustache, and wears wire-rimmed glasses. He is holding a wooden cane in his right hand. At his feet is a bi-color Spaniel-type dog that is sitting and looking off to the side. Immediately behind the man are distinct, landscaped areas, with cultivated flowers and plants. In the distance is an open field with one large tree and a house.

White Oak Cemetery was dedicated on November 3, 1895. It is now called Chattanooga Memorial Park. It is located in the North Shore/Dayton area of Chattanooga on Memorial Drive.

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

Older African American man on a mule, White Oak Cemetery. Charles Walline

Title: Older African American man on a mule, White Oak Cemetery. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0011

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

An older African American man sits astride a mule at White Oak Cemetery. The bearded man is wearing dark pants with the hems rolled up, a jacket, a white shirt, and a slouching hat. His left hand rests on his hip, while his right hand holds the reins. The man is not using a saddle, but has blankets on the mule. He is standing on cleared soil but is surrounded by tall grasses, bushes, and trees.

White Oak Cemetery was dedicated on November 3, 1895. It is now called Chattanooga Memorial Park. It is located in the North Shore/Dayton area of Chattanooga on Memorial Drive.

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

Young girl playing upright piano. Charles Walline

Title: Young girl playing upright piano. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0010

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

A young girl is playing the upright piano in a parlor or music room. The girl has her back to the camera. She is wearing a floral print dress with ruffles at the sleeves. Her long blond hair is loose down her back and there is a large bow in her hair. On the top of the piano are three sets of portraits and a china figurine. A stringed instrument is leaning against the wall next to the piano. There is a chair and a settee with pillows on it in the room. Next to the piano is a small end table that is covered with a lace-edged white tablecloth. There is a vase with flowers and several china cups and saucers on the table. Two framed pictures are on the walls.

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

Receipt on billhead, E. R. Betterton & Co.

Title: Receipt on billhead, E. R. Betterton & Co, Pleasant Valley Wine Co., NY

Catalog Number: 2017.021.0001

Date (Years): 1905

Description:

Receipt on billhead from E. R. Betterton & Co. to Pleasant Valley Wine Co., Rhe–s, NY, dated November 1, 1905. The billhead notes a check in the amount of $187.49 for payment of bills due to them from October 17, 1905. The billhead states “Established 1870. E. R. Betterton & Co. Importers, Wholesale Liquor Dealers and Distillers. Chattanooga, Tenn.” There is an etching of a bottle of White Oak Sour Mash Tennessee Whiskey to the left.

Elijah R. Betterton: The Confederate Who Came Out a Winner

The Battle of Five Forks fought on April 1, 1965, was the last major clash of North and South in the Civil War. Nine days later Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House.

But for Elijah Betterman, whose subsequent career as a Tennessee whiskey man brought wealth and prominence, the war was far from over. Captured at Five Forks he would spend months in a notorious Yankee prison camp.

Betterton was a native Virginian, born Campbell County not far from Lynchburg, to parents Thomas and Charlotte Betterton, both native-born Virginians. His father ran a grist mill and a small still on Hat Creek. The 1860 census found Elijah, 14, living with his parents, an older sister, and brother, and a younger sister at Naruna, an unincorporated community located along a rail line. At the age of 17 in 1962 Betterton enlisted in the Lynchburg Home Guard, a unit that already had seen hard fighting at First Manassas and Antietam. It can be assumed that Elijah was engaged at Gettysburg with the Home Guard, which sustained heavy losses there. In 1864, accord to military records, he joined the 11th Virginia Volunteer Infantry, part of a Corps composed of one infantry and three cavalry divisions and commanded by Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett.

Recognizing the importance of the intersection of four major roads represented by Five Forks in central Virginia, Lee ordered Pickett to hold it “at all hazards.” Union Maj. Gen Phillip H. Sheridan’s attack overwhelmed the Confederate forces, as shown here, forcing Pickett to retreat. Some have called the battle, “The Waterloo of the Confederacy.” The 11th Infantry lost heavily in men killed and captured. Betterton was among the latter, sent to Point Lookout, a prison camp on a narrow strip of land between the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay. It had a notorious reputation. Thousands had died there of hunger and disease, guarded by hostile African-American troops.

Although the war officially ended in April 1865, Betterton was not released until late that year or early the next, spending months as a prisoner of war. Upon his release, he returned to Naruna and resumed the family business. A descendant described the operation: “A portion of the corn brought in by farmers was taken as a fee by the grist mill. There was no money. The corn was distilled in a pot still; no licenses were required; little whiskey was sold for cash but exchanged for food, meat, linsey woolen, etc. The whiskey was made faster than it sold or could be drunk.”

Elijah also quickly married upon his return home. His bride was Delilah, called “Lila.,” like her husband a native born Virginian. He was 21, she was 20. Before long they were joined by a boy child they named Thomas after Betterton’s father. With them was a 12-year-old domestic servant, a mulatto girl whose name was given to the census taker as Martha Betterton. Too old to have been a child of Elijah’s, the relationship remains unexplained. Within several years Elijah had saved enough money to move his small family by train to Chattanooga, Tennessee. There he opened a bar and a small wholesale liquor business. A grandson has a copper barrel stencil dated 1870 that shows “E. R. Betterton & Co. Hand Made Sour Mash Polk County Corn Whiskey.”

According to family lore, after 1880 Betterton decided to “become respectable,” getting out of the liquor trade and going into the wholesale drug business in Dallas, Texas. He sold everything in Chattanooga except one small rental house and sent his trusted bookkeeper to Dallas to rent a building and lay in a stock of drugs. The bookkeeper carried the checkbook and was empowered to write checks for purchases. When Betterton, his wife, and five children arrived the warehouse was filled with stock, no bills had been paid and the bookkeeper and $500,000 were gone. He was last heard of in Mexico.

His money gone, Betterton, with his family in tow, limped back into Chattanooga, moved into the rental house and opened a small bar at 435 Market Street. Within a year, he had found a partner in J. C. Martin, a local Tennessee resident, and opened up a new wholesale liquor business under the name E.R. Betterton & Co., as shown on the company letterhead and on two varieties of amber flasks.

As a result of initial success, about 1885, the partners had the resources to construct their own building at 100 West Seventh Street. During this period, although calling themselves distillers, they were buying whiskey from small local distilleries, “rectifying” it and selling it as their own. As with other outfits involved in the blending process, Betterton and his partner found it difficult to assure a steady supply of product. About 1895 they decided to open their own distillery, locating it on Signal Mountain Road near Valdeau, Tennessee. They called it White Oak Distillery. They hired a young but experienced distiller named Bill Tolley to run the operation.

Unfortunately, their first distillery, although it prospered, had no easy transportation access. It was away from the Tennessee River and five miles from the nearest railroad. As a result of 1899 Betterton and his partner built a second distillery on the south bank of the river just east of the Market Street bridge. An illustration of this facility emphasizes its nearness to river and rail transport.

E. R. Betterton & Co.’s flagship brand became White Oak Distillery Tennessee Whiskey. It was sold in quart bottles and flasks with an elaborate label showing a pot still and bearing the Betterton company name. The same design was also replicated on company giveaway items to favored customers, including shot glasses and highball glasses. In time the firm also opened an outlet in Cincinnati, shown here on another Betterton shot glass. Betterton also took his son, Elijah (called “Lige”) Junior, into the firm as his son rose to maturity.

In addition to selling his own whiskey brands, Betterton became an outlet for some of the best-selling brands in America, including “Duffy Pure Malt,” “Cascade Whiskey,” “Old Overholt,” “Gibsons XXXX.” and “Tannhaeuser Export Beer.” If you were looking for a “sole agent,” the merchandising genius of Betterton’s firm would have strong appeal as would its access to markets in the Nation’s mid-South.

The Betterton family suffered a major loss when in 1910 Elijah’s wife, Delilah, at the age of 63, died after a long illness at the family home, surrounded by her grieving family. That personal loss was followed for Betterton several years later when in 1913 Tennessee voted statewide Prohibition. Distilleries were still allowed but could only sell out of state.

In effect, Tennessee was trying to eat its cake and have it too. Elijah and his collaborators were too canny to comply. That year they decided to close out the distillery and the wholesale liquor operation.

Lige Betterton and a partner then opened a wholesale house under the name “E. R. Betterton” in Rossville, Georgia, just over the Tennessee state line. Liquor could still be sent by freight from Chattanooga to Georgia. For a time, it was legal for the Betterton’s to ship whiskey back to thirsty Tennessee customers by express freight and even parcel post. As a result, by 1917 most of the family’s stock in the Tennessee warehouses and at the distillery had been exhausted. A few years later, this kind of transaction was rendered illegal by the U.S. Congress.

Betterton did not let the collapse of his liquor interests deter him. In 1914 he formed the Betterton & England Shoe Company. The firm claimed to be footwear wholesalers. Ever the entrepreneur, about 1917 at the age of 71, Elijah bought out his partner and re-incorporated. His shoe company was closed out in the economic

Another cause may have been Elijah’s own death. He passed away in May of 1922 and was buried next to Delilah at the Forest Hill Cemetery near Chattanooga. In the future, his son and namesake, Elijah Junior, would be selected as mayor (1947) of Chattanooga, the town Elijah Senior had adopted as his own. This Confederate prisoner of war and his family had come a long way.

Notes: On an Internet site, George Wallace, the grandson of Elijah R. Betterton, has provided insights into the life and activities of his grandfather.

The material in this post has relied in part on the information Wallace provided in a short article written about his family.

Source: http://pre-prowhiskeymen.blogspot.com/2013/08/elijah-r-betterton-was-confederate-who.html

This billhead is dated November 1, 1905, from Chattanooga, TN. Made out to the Pleasant Valley Wine Co., Remus, NY.

Gentleman. We enclose check $187.49 in payment of bills
as below Trusting you will find the same correct,
We are very truly yours, E. R. Betterton & Co.
In settlement of Oct 17 $195.30
4% $7.81
$187.49

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Miller Brothers Company paper bag, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Title: Miller Brothers Company paper bag, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Catalog Number: 2017.020.0001

Date (Years): 1931-1940

Description:

Paper bag states “Miller Bros. Co. “The Store That Saves You Money” Chattanooga, Tenn.” There is an etching of the corner store, which is four stories with large display windows on the street and smaller windows on the other stories. People are walking on the sidewalk in front of the store and cars are driving on the street. An American flag flies above the roof.

Miller’s traced its history to the New York Racket Store, established in 1889 at 510 Market Street in Chattanooga by brothers Gus and Frank Miller. After a fire destroyed the Richardson Building in 1897, the brothers built a new store at Seventh and Market Streets that was known as Miller Brothers Department Store. Miller Brothers Department Store of Chattanooga remained a privately held company until 1973. A son of Gus Miller later become one of the founders of Miller, Inc. in Knoxville.

Miller’s Department Store was formed August 1, 1973, from the consolidation by retail conglomerate Garfinckel, Brooks Brothers, Miller & Rhoads, Inc. of the two related Tennessee-based department stores: Miller Brothers of Chattanooga and Miller, Inc., of Knoxville.

At formation, the combined chain had 11 stores and two specialty shops in East Tennessee, Georgia, Virginia, and North Carolina.

In 1981, with the acquisition of its parent conglomerate, Miller’s became a part of Allied Stores. In 1986, the chain was acquired in a hostile takeover by Hess’s; then converted to Dillard’s in 1992.

Source: Wikipedia

This paper bag depicts window renovations from the 1930s and dates to about that time. The verso is unprinted

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
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Incline No. 2, railway cars traveling the tracks, Lookout Mountain

Title: Incline No. 2, railway cars traveling the tracks, Lookout Mountain

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0009

Date (Years): 1891-1900

Description:

Incline No. 2, railway car at the bottom of the terminus, Lookout Mountain. Another railway car is traveling up the tracks and is in the middle distance. In the far distance is the top of the ridge and the terminus building. The tracks are flanked on both sides by rough wooden poles and trees. Photograph is taken from the bottoem railway car and you see the corner of that car in the image, along with a cane chair with a delivery tag on it that is addressed to A. J. Marble, Lookout Inn, Chattanooga, Tenn.

The Incline No. 1 was built in 1885 and was constructed to provide an alternative route up Lookout Mountain. Until its construction, travelers were forced to use the Whiteside Turnpike and pay increasing fees, imposed by its owner, Harriet Whiteside, to access the road. The Incline No. 1 and the Point Hotel (constructed at the top of its track) provided travelers with access to areas of Lookout Mountain that Whiteside had restricted.

Source: http://www.ridetheincline.com/history

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

Sparking Atlantic Ale label, Atlantic Company, Chattanooga, Tennessee

Title: Sparking Atlantic Ale label, Atlantic Company, Chattanooga, Tennessee

Catalog Number: 2017.019.0001

Date (Years): 1931-1940

Description:

Atlantic Sparkling Ale label for the Atlantic (Brewery) Company. Graphic consists of an older, white-haired African American man acting as a waiter, holding up a tray of ale bottles and glasses. States “Sparkling Atlantic Ale, Atlantic Company, Chattanooga, Tennessee” and “Content 12 fl. oz” and “Internal Revenue Tax Paid”. At the bottom two heads of wheat support the main graphic. There is a stamp for the International Union of U.S.F.C. & S.O.W. within the graphic

The Brewery opened in Chattanooga in 1933, the label dates to 1937.

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Woman and young girl by rose bush. Charles Walline

Title: Woman and young girl by rose bush. Charles Walline

Catalog Number: 2015.001.0008

Date (Years): 1891-1900, 1901-1910

Description:

A young girl stands in front of a rose bush while a woman stands off to the side. The setting is a residential yard with an expanse of grass surrounding a large rose bush. Trees and shrubs and a fence boarder the yard. A stone courtyard and the edge of a house are visible by to the woman. The woman has light hair and is wearing a plain dress with a long, white apron over the skirt. The little girl is wearing a short, sleeveless, white shift and is holding a cut rose in her right hand. She has dark, chin length hair with short bangs.

An attribution for non-commerce use is required when utilizing images in this collection.  Please use the  “Courtesy of Picnooga” and link to this website whenever possible.  Members of the media or inquiries about commercial use, please contact us directly by using the “Ask a question” button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen.

Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Under the following terms:

Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

NonCommercial — You may not use the material for commercial purposes.

No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Notices:

You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable exception or limitation.

No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as publicity, privacy, or moral rights may limit how you use the material.

URL for this statement:
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

Charles Gustavus Walline
March 30, 1874 — July 14, 1943

Charles was born March 30th, 1874 at 107 Payne Street. The house remains today as 607 Battery Place.

He was coming of age as Chattanooga experienced an economic boom during the 1890s and was witness to the first paving of Market Street, early streetcars, and the construction of the Walnut Street Bridge. By 1897 a 23-year-old Walline turned his attention to photography.  He was a listed a member of the Chattanooga Camera Club in 1897, along with the successful local commercial photographer E. L. Mudge.  Walline was also passionate about Chattanooga’s history and was listed as the ‘historian’ for the Chattanooga Half-Century Club during the group’s inaugural meeting Dec. 4, 1936.

Walline worked at D. B. Loveman & Co. for many years, and in 1918 was listed as a Department Manager. In 1920, he’s listed as Notary Public for the store.  Several images within the glass plate collection show exterior and interior shots of the Lovemans store.  

He died at age 76 at his home on South Crest Road on Missionary Ridge.

The Walline collection came in three parts.

The largest portion was sold to Picnooga by a private collector who was passing through Chattanooga within the past ten years.  The second largest part was donated by Mr. Charles Coulter who purchased them at an estate sale many years ago. The third group was purchased from a local collector who bought them on eBay a few years ago.

Many of the images in the collection are of Charles Walline’s home on Payne Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

Left, Walline in abt. 1900. Right, Charles Walline and his wife, Millie. 1930s

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